ONLINE CLASS: Italian Opera Appreciation- Act 2, Verdi

DATES: 11/18/2020 - 12/02/2020
LOCATION: None
PRICE: $65.00
ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR:

Patricia Pease began her professional career in Boston after earning Bachelor of Music and Master of Music degrees from New England Conservatory. She has appeared in concert throughout various national regions, and in Italy, and with symphony orchestras from New Hampshire to The Philippines. She has been praised for her interpretive powers applied to a wide repertory ranging from the Baroque to Modern periods. Pease has been critically acclaimed for “a splendid (and never overdone) sense of drama,” with the ability to “…put across a song as few singers can.” (Seattle Times), and she has been characterized as “an elegant singer, one of poise and style.” (Seattle Post-Intelligencer).

Read More

In opera Ms. Pease has sung roles for the Santa Fe Opera, Seattle Opera, Pacific Chamber Opera, Metropolitan Manila Theatre, and the Florida State Opera at FSU.  As guest professor she has given masterclasses and performances at the Hochschule für Musik und Theater Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy in Leipzig (the oldest conservatory in Europe), and for conservatories in Buenos Aires and Mendoza, Argentina.

She was director of the Ohio University Fine Arts Study Program onsite in London in spring quarters 2007, 2008, and 2010. Chair of the Voice Division in the School of Music at Ohio University from 2001 to 2011.

Pease is now Associate Professor Emerita and lives in Edmonds, WA.

From the early Renaissance until the present day, Italian composers have been known as the reigning “melodists,” and is it any wonder? The Italian language itself is brimming with music. Opera was born in Italy, and it was the creative genius of Italian composers that led the rest of the world in developing the wonders of lyric drama. Please join me for a three-part class devoted to the works of three giants among Italian opera composers of the 19th and 20th centuries. I’m calling my course

If Music Be the Food of Love: The Delights of Italian Opera in Three Acts

These sessions will all be a live presentation by Patti interspersed with video recordings of excerpts from various professional opera performances featuring stars from opera houses around the world.  There will be time after each presentation for comments and questions.


November 18                         Act Two – VERDI and SHAKESPEARE

A dynamic duo by any standards. Verdi set three of Shakespeare’s classic plays, one very early in his creative  output – Macbeth – and two at the height of his fame as the pre-eminent  opera composer of Italy: Otello (Othello) and Falstaff (The Merry Wives of Windsor). Of Verdi’s setting of Othello, the playwright and music critic, George Bernard Shaw, said, “Instead of Otello being an Italian opera written in the style of Shakespeare, Othello is a play written by Shakespeare in the style of Italian opera.” We shall see splendid excerpts from all three of these masterpieces!

Jonas Kaufmann and Maria Agresta in Otello – Royal Opera House Covent Garden


December 2                           Act Three – PUCCINI and the EXOTICA

Puccini found inspiration for his operas by attending live theater performances. After attending a performance in London of American playwright, David Belasco’s play, Madame Butterfly, he was set on a path of discovery of exotic settings from the Far East to the Wild West.  The results are Madama Butterfly, La Fanciulla del West (Girl of the Golden West), and Turandot. The heroines of all three operas are faced with incredible challenges and choices. This class features excerpts taken from three remarkable productions – two from the Metropolitan Opera and one from the Royal Opera House Covent Garden.

Ermonela Jaho as Ciò-Ciò San in Madama Butterfly – Royal Opera House Covent Garden

Since opera should definitely be heard optimally as well as seen, we encourage students to enhance their audio capabilities either by attaching their devices to external speakers or using a good pair of headphones, wireless or otherwise.

As we do at the Dievole Winery in Tuscany, where Patti gives this lecture in person, we recommend you come with a glass of your favorite Chianti, a cocktail or a Spritz*, sit back and enjoy the presentation.


Class Dates: Wednesdays, November 18 and December 2  (First session, Act 1, was on November 11.  It is not necessary to have attended Act 1 to appreciate Acts 2 or 3.)

Time:  6:45pm Eastern Time (That is 5:45pm Central time, 4:45pm Mountain time and 3:45pm Pacific time)

Class Length:  1 hour + questions

Price:  $35 for single class or the next 2 in the series for $65.


* Aperol Spritz explained by Linda Mironti

If you’ve been in Italy recently, especially around Venice, you’ll recall seeing these glowing aperitifs on café tables everywhere. A “spritz” for short is a popular warm-weather drink that you can make at home. The traditional type seen here uses the orange digestif called Aperol (which is made with a secret mixture of herbs), but you can also use the bright red Campari.  These drinks are not sweet, but quite light and refreshing for an afternoon lingering in the piazza.

Here’s our recipe:

Classic:
• 1 1/2 ounces Aperol (or Campari)
• 2 ounces Prosecco (Italian sparkling wine similar to champagne)
• a splash of sparkling water
• Add an orange wedge for garnish.

Alternate: (instead of pro secco, use white wine and add the effervescence with sparkling water)

• 1 1/2 ounces Aperol (or Campari)
• 2 ounces dry white wine
• 1 1/2 ounces sparkling water
• Add an orange wedge for garnish

In Venice, which claims to be the birthplace of the “authentic” spritz, they also add a green olive or two – for sophistication.


This class is online.  You can enjoy it from your own home using your laptop, iPad or smartphone.

Once you register, we’ll send you a Zoom link to join the class on the specific day, at the appointed hour.

You don’t need a Zoom account.  Just click the link and you will be admitted.

We will send you the zoom invitation once you register for the class.

Please log in a few minutes early to greet the others and to get situated.